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tend to be older men, educated in a certain way that didn't study such matters and most historians were not educated in the matter office -- matters of the heart and the hearth. but by studying the first ladies -- the first think thomas jefferson did after spending 1 days cooped up in a loft outside of philadelphia, writing the declaration of independence, the first thing he did was he went shopping for martha, his wife. he was pregnant and had had a miscarriage, and he bought her some gloves. then he begged off from serving for the rest of the summer so he could go home to be with his wife. every within -- every interof -- every winter of the revolutionary war, there was martha washington. i propose washington's closer advisor was alexander hamilton, and one chapter talks about hamilton's history of womanizing, bill clinton was not the first and was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior and high office. there's a long history. itot spitzer, arnold schwarzenegger, david petraeus, had nothing on alexander hamilton. if you read letters written by martha washington during those winter
that. we need to first get to be fair. if someone's got a dollar and he's educated and he should be in the slot or should be voted for, he should be able to. forget about the billions that people have getting themselves into office. i think it's terrible. host: all right, robert. we're going to leave it there. we're going to take a break from our discussion regarding term limits for elected officials and talk about a decision that was handed down by the federal court of appeals yesterday. to talk to us about that, we're going to bring in josh hicks of the "the washington post," the federal blogger. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. host: the lead in this morning's "the washington post," your paper, says boil boil officials -- says obama officials ruled in power, courts cut power of appointment, judges limit action during senate recesses. the president exceeded his constitutional authority by making appointments when the senate was on a break last year, a federal appeals court ruled friday the court's broad ruling would sharply limited power that pr
structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it can you imagines what the society could achieve when our women fully participate as equal partners in ev
of the commission. >> president carter appointed you. >> carter appointed me when i left his education, running education. yet in the department of education and i went back to teaching at the appointed me to the commission. >> at what point to become the the u.s. civil rights commission will become a permanent agency? >> after the first year when the reports that they did -- with the commission did was instead of sitting down and saying, okay. we are here as a safety valve and don't really -- they did some hearings. major power that the commission has, and a point this out in the book. to me it is the most important thing about the commission. does what it is supposed to do it will go out and listen to people that nobody else will listen to. problems, civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the powe
education. got a new department of education. >> host: at what point do you become for the civil rights commission would become a permanent agency in a sense? >> guest: after the first year , what the commission did this instead of sitting down seine which is here as a safety valve, they different hearings. the major power the commission had an ipod this in the book continues the most important thing. when it does what it's supposed to do, it will go out and listen to people nobody else will listen to. the civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention. not just local people, but the federal government would write letters. nobody would pay attention. the civil rights commission decided they would go out of that they had decided and they had the power under the statute to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said the reason i want to get it passed by congress to set up an executive orders because my attorney general tells me that's the only way they can subpoena anybody. some people may not want to come to testify, said the commission has the most important
, entrepreneurial group of business men and women, scientists, educators and workers on the planet. companies like silicon energy in marysville are leading the world with some of the most durable solar cells ever built. janicki industries in sedro- wooley is driving innovation in aerospace. valve, a software company in bellevue has grown into a worldwide leader in interactive entertainment. and in grays harbor an across- the-board effort led to the re- opening of the paper mill last year, putting 175 people back to work making 100% recycled paper. i had this to say about washington. innovation is in our genes. [applause] we create. we invent. we build. so now we must go forward, with both high ambition and a recognition that the power of innovation will fuel the next wave of job growth in washington. make no mistake, our top priority today, tomorrow, and every day for the next four years, is jobs. we must build a working washington, capable of sustained economic leadership in a rapidly changing world. my plan focuses on job growth in seven industry clusters. aerospace, life sciences, military, agr
that americans are too educated to do. >> susie: so what does this mean for your, the group that you represent, there are many small businesses. they hire a lot of less skills immigrants. is this going to help or hurt them. is it going to create more competition for those small businesses? >> no those the employers i represent desperately want a legal way to hire low-skilled workers. they're running restaurants. they're running food processing operations they're running hotels and they face a choice right now. they hire workers and they run them through the system but they're never sure if those cards are accurate or not. whether the system is really accurate. they want ways to hire legal immigrants so that they're not putting their businesses at riskment and ideally this will offer that both by legalizing people already here but also creating a line for workers to come in in the future a pipeline for legal low skilled workers to enter the country. >> how do they feel about this framework, a lot of new rules will come into play here, employee verification papers, things like that. what how doe
students and faculty members who want to improve their education or career. >>> it is the defense's turn now in the misconduct trial of the anne arundel county executive john leopold accused of using his detail to make sexual encounters and keep tabs on his political enemies. today the judge dropped one of the five charges against him because the state did not meet its burden of proof. >>> hundreds of thousands of pro life demonstrators packed onto the national mall on d.c., their goal to get the supreme court to overturn the historic decision in honor of what they call abortion's 55 million victims. >> reporter: undaunted by bitterly cold temperatures and of a snow forecast pro life marchers came to washington as they have for four decades determined to instill a culture of life in a nation that they say has seen 55 million abortions since the landmark decision row v wade was handed down. >> can a nation endure that does not respect the sanctity of life? >> reporter: the question is backed by stunning numbers. the pro choice institute finds four in 10 unintended pregnancies in the u.s
. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congress. and this is not something that the president can do alone. it is the congress decides how big the deficit will be but the president has to work with congress. we need more revenue and we need to drive down spending. i think the president understands that and he is working on this but he cannot do this alone. >> looki
, a successful farmers, people who had high education. and they traveled the world and learned from other cultures. they had out -- studied government from other countries from taking and choosing from the various things and do come up with creative solutions for the issues they thought had not been resolved. what i am gratified is more people are voting now than they have in the past years. it is their obligation. to not let the country just happened. but create the country they want. that is why i tell people when they ask how you feel about the immigration law? how do you feel? because they generally have cases and i don't want to people to believe i made at my mind. i haven't prettify express an opinion that is what they will believe. but having said that, what i often say is why aren't you asking yourself? what you doing about it? if you thank you don't like something? that is what your country was founded on with your people getting up and starting a war to start a country i am not suggesting a rebellion. [laughter] far from that, please. but i am encouraging civic responsibility. w
and celebrate it because it's the bedrock of our country's success. on education, the president of the united states has an opportunity to strengthen our classrooms and recommit to public education in this country, our teachers, so we can compete in a global market. now, for the republicans, they have vilified all of these institutions. they think that tax cuts for the wealthy and deregulation is exactly how we should run the country, and that's it. president obama actually accomplished a heck of a lot in his first term. but there is so much more he can do on a number of important issues facing our country in the second term. we are a center-left country. we are progressive. progressives are in the majority. we have to think like that as a movement. we have to think like that as a people. and the chatter across the street, we learned one thing about those folks during the 2012 election. they lie. they do a pretty good job of it. so when we start going down the road of immigration reform and climate change and fair taxation and public education, we'll get plenty of lies from the right, because
. then there is everything else, food, education, infrastructure, everything else the federal government does. ryan doesn't really say exactly which programs he is really cutting here. but it is where he is cutting. he gets four and a half times this budget as he does from medicare. it is about half the total cuts and it is a huge cut. we don't know the programs that will get the axe, but he has given us enough detail on it, to say that about two thirds of ryan's budget cuts comes from programs for the poor. but that is quite a bit. and he is still not balancing the budget until 2038. so how is ryan going to take the budget, which is already pretty rough and has pretty unpopular policies in it and get it to balance in ten years as opposed to 30? ironically, one thing that actually helps him a lot is the fiscal cliff deal, baecause it actually raises taxes. here is his explanation. >> all right, can you get to balance in ten years and not raise revenues? >> yes, yes, the revenue baseline is obviously higher now that we have this cliff behind us. >> i want you to listen to that again. they asked paul ryan,
concerned about, people are concerned about health care costs and education costs. and to a lesser extent, when economic growth is stronger as it was later in the bush years maybe they're concerned about issues related to the bottom and so. education and health care and sort of the broader challenge of globalization, those things loom incredibly large and the republican imagination and those are not issues republicans like to talk about. this is where compassion conservatism didn't emerge any backing to emerge in the late 1990s from a period when bill clinton had been something republicans up and down washington for four, six years. and the whole point of bush's him was to craft a republican party that had something to say about education. that's something to say about health care. you can go back and said, i think justifiably, that something like the prescription drugs bill was too big, cost too much, should've bee been paid fn someone been paid for and so wanted you to make similar critiques with no child left behind by the republican party will never get back to the wilderness if it ju
. they were people who had higher education's and they actually travel the world and learn from other cultures. the constitution was written by men who had studied the government's through history and other countries and picking and choosing from the various things that they saw describing the things they felt didn't work and coming up with creative solutions for the issues they thought hadn't been resolved by others. more people are voting now than they had in past years because of worries me when the citizens for debt that it is their obligation not to let the country just happened, but to create a the country that they want. they tell me how did you feel about immigration lollies, the immigration law, how do you feel about the debate on the amendment and there are always questions like that would be called i generally have the cases i am still considering our that we have made up our mind because i haven't. but if i express an opinion, that is what they will believe. having said that what you can say to them is why are you asking me? why aren't you asking yourself? what do you think? and wh
laid out a number of executive actions was secretary arne duncan of the department of education that look at schools and the climate of bullying, school security increasing the number of school resource officers. a number of schools have metal detectors in them. if local schools want to increase their security, there are obviously free to do that. appropriations may be there to increase that. keeping the guns out of the hands of people who would use them for ill is the number one priority as well. i think you also have to take a look at what has happened in schools. a lot of people forget at columbine, they're actually where guards on the campus. they exchanged fire with the perpetrators of the crime. they were outgunned because the military-style assault weapons. it is not just having police and armed folks on school campuses. virginia tech had a police force and is what squad and they still were not able to bring down the shooter. host: the washington times above this --spreading gun hysteria is the way they put it. they ride gun owners should be concerned about the open seaso
of education, research and development, innovation energy. there are things we can do about it but we have to do them together as a country. that's our goal. >> i do think it's important to put in context and remember just how dark the days were four years ago and how in the middle of that meltdown, people were thinking about going to caves and getting spam and guns. it was dark. not only the president, but the president working with george w. bush and others really pitched in and had to make very tough decisions and a lot of hard votes that got a lot of people unelected from office to get us through that. >> when we got our first economic briefings, i wanted to get some spam and go into a cave. i know what you're talking about. >> that's why this is such an opportunity, though, for the president right now. the problems we're talking about are structural. they've been there for a long time. this declining middle class has gone on for two decades. it isn't just the recession. that means investing. this is where the problem of the debt comes in. if you're going to get bet
. i have worked with republican governors to pass balanced budget while protecting of education and vital health care programs. it's really the same principled debate that's happening here, how to balance the budget but do it in ways that are responsible and that protect the middle class, that protect medicare and social security, but also reached across the aisle and do it in ways that are constructive and that allowance to reach compromise together. host: you mentioned your service in the state legislature in nevada. why come to washington? what can you do differently than you can back home? guest: our legislature in nevada is a citizens legislature. we met every other year. in addition to being a legislator, i work full time. i'm husband and father of three. this gives me an opportunity to serve my constituents 100% of the time. extremely humbling and honoring experience to be here. host: the debt ceiling vote, scheduled to see that happen today. how do you plan to vote? and once your opinion? guest: we really need a longer- term policy that allows greater certainty particula
talked about the government that we won which is infrastructure, education, regulation and the good things and recognize the government can't solve all the problems, i thought that was a reaching out, if you will, a shout to the tea party right that's rejectionist. >> as we saw in pennsylvania, and professional that morning there's so much of this willingness to win the election by the republicans, they know they're headed into trouble. many like lebanon, take the fences down. okay, we're never going to be popular again so we're going to have to rig it. >> sean: so it's the gettysburg address, obama. republicans are going to have to steal elections. that's how bad nbc's gotten, that's the coverage. >> a couple of points about this quote, unquote news network and this quote, unquote newsman. on the gettysburg address, chris mathews has it it exactly wrong. he has the opposite. the gettysburg address was an attempt at healing of nation' wounds at the end of the civil war. obama's speech yesterday was a left wing declaration of war against the movement. and it was opposite. after the r
to see some education program do some outreach. and make sure that their tenants will have the benefits. >> supervisor mar. >> supervisor mar: that's a great suggestion. the department of health is working with tenant organizations. making sure that not only representative groups but smaller property owners have multilingual materials. the department of public health has been working at the small business level and other places and we need an outreach policy. that's a great suggestion. >> i want to thank supervisor yee of raising the issue of small mom-and-pop landlords who may not always be aware of all the regulations and we need to outreach to them. in addition to the apartment association, -- >> i forgot to mention that supervisor malia cohen is a cosponsor. >> president: can we take this item same house, same call without objection this ordinance is passed first reading. >> item 23. >> same house same call, ordinance passed in first reading. >> item 24. amending the campaign and government conduct code. >> president: same house, same call. passed on first reading. item 25. >
. but as she prepares to spend another four years at the white house, some critics suggest the harvard-educated lawyer should take on more policy-heavy goals. top advisers push back. >> well, there were policies behind the initiatives that she did. >> reporter: valerie jarrett says the first lady and you her staff are working on a new agenda. >> she really is very determined to make sure that they think it through thoroughly and that they don't just do one-off things. she wants to really make sure that it's thought out. >> reporter: ivillage chief correspondent kelly wallace covers michelle obama. >> she is obviously going to add other issues to her plate. i wouldn't be surprised if you hear her talking more about work/life balance. >> reporter: no matter what the first lady's new agenda holds, advisers say the role of mom-in-chief will always be her top priority. >> every day, i hope that i'm doing right by my girls. every day. >> reporter: malia is now 14 and sasha, 11. that means college applications and all the challenges that lie ahead. >> as i get a little bit older and as i have now so a
and it would be a tragedy if this country moved in a direction to make education less affordable. so we as a university are very dependent and concerned about the fiscal health of this country. >> host: amy gutmann, are you also in the classroom at the university? >> guest: i enjoy teaching and take every opportunity to meet with students, talk to students and teacher my spare time. >> host: what does a provost do and how library at princeton? >> guest: i was at princeton for 28 years of the time i got my phd to the time i came to pan and was dean of the faculty at princeton and the chief academic and financial officer at princeton or the progress works closely with the president. >> host: with the learning curve on being president of the university? >> guest: well, the learning curve is steep for anybody and it's also very exciting. >> host: gives a primer. just go the university of pennsylvania had 10,000 undergraduates and 10 dozen graduate students. we have about 4500 faculty members. we ran three hospitals and we have a great school of medicine as well as a great school of arts and
and provide the relief and save the programs and give them some opportunity working through areas on education, hopefully, the white house will finally join us in some of thosests, and there are all kinds of things and workforce training and others that we can find common ground on depending on whether the mood today lasts. >>neil: do you get a sense they are leery, the dims, to go too crazy on spending cuts. the president told president obama he sees it as a health care problem. if they get health care spending under control you may not have to attack some of the other entitlements they charge you are trying to rip apart. what do you say to that, it is almost entirely health care? >> well, there are examples throughout the federal government where the dollars are not spent wisely. we ought to treat it as other people's money because it is the money earned bit taxpayers and we have an obligation to make sure that we don't continue the wasteful ways of washington. we intend in the house of representatives to promote an agenda that allows for getting spending under control, not just in the healt
the u.s. department of education shows the high school education rate in the united states is the highest in almost 40 years. 78% of students are finishing on time. that's the best number since 1976. but 20% are not able to finish high school in four years. in california 405,000 students graduated in 2010 and almost 93,000 dropped out. the california drop out rate of 5% is higher than the national average. >>> sacramento mayor kevin johnson has one last chance to keep the sacramento kings from leaving town. the nba has confirmed that the maloof brothers have agreed to sell the kings to a seattle based investment group. sacramento has just a couple of months to make a counter offer before the nba meeting and signs off on the deal. they also plan to reinstate seattle super sonics. >>> we've been hanging on to the house i guess for probably going on two years now wanting to sell. >> a big shift in the bay area real estate market. >> but first we'll go back to the nation's capital. the key difference between today's inauguration compared to four years ago. mmmma choice of 6 ski
to the the slain leader. ktvu news. >>> a new report from the u.s. department of education shows the high school education rate in the united states is the highest in almost 40 years. 78% of students are finishing on time. that's the best number since 1976. but 20% are not able to finish high school in four years. in california 405,000 students graduated in 2010 and almost 93,000 dropped out. the california drop out rate of 5% is higher than the national average. >>> sacramento mayor kevin johnson has one last chance to keep the sacramento kings from leaving town. the nba has confirmed that the maloof brothers have agreed to sell the kings to a seattle based investment group. sacramento has just a couple of months to make a counter offer before the nba meeting and signs off on the deal. they also plan to reinstate seattle super sonics. >>> we've been hanging on to the house i guess for probably going on two years now wanting to sell. >> a big shift in the bay area real estate there is no mass produced human. so we created the extraordinarily comfortable sleep number experience. a collection of i
five? top three? caller code jobs, education, and for the end of the war. -- caller: jobs, education, for the war to end. host: let's hear the president speaking on the economy, social security, and medicare. caller: we the people -- [video clip] >> many barely make it. we believe that america's prosperity must rest upon the broad shoulders of a rising middle class. we know that america thrives when every person confined independence. on the wages of honest labor, liberating families from the brink of hardship. we are true to our creed, when a little girl born into bleakest poverty has the same chances to succeed as anyone else because she is an american, free and equal, not just in the eyes of god, but in our own eyes. we the people still believe that every citizen deserves a measure of security and dignity. we must make the hard choices to reduce the cost of health care and reduce the size of our deficits. but we reject the belief that america must choose between caring for the generation that built this country and investing in the generation that will build its future. [applause]
so much from education to climate change to gun control to all sorts of stuff. the big question tonight is what can he actually prioritize and what can he actually make happen? where do you think his real priorities lie? >> he did a wonderful job today. he helped renew, rekindle the american spirit, calling us to what has always made america great, all of us working together to forge a stronger america, and he laid out his agenda. one of economic competitiveness and investing in education, and he put climate change on the line for the first time in a long time. as well as immigration reform, talking about immigration and how they're going to replenish america. it's not going to bei easy to gt any of those thing s done, but these are the types of moments that bring americans together and there's real hope in that. >> what about if the president has to choose? gun control -- marco rubio on the republican side, putting forth, it fits well with what the president has to say. >> i think immigration reform is easier. that doesn't mean it's less important, but it's easier, gun safety a
is undecided about her pregnancy, she's educated about all the options available to her. the knowledge that a pregnancy center can provide her, with the help she needs during pregnancy and after she needs the baby -- she has the baby, often makes the difference between life and death of the child in her womb. regardless of the mistakes she may have made in her life or the decisions she makes for her future, she is treated with love and respect. i commend and i thank god for the thousands of staff and volunteers at pregnancy resource centers all over this nation. we are a very bright light in the midst of a dark state of affairs. with god's help, we will prevail. [applause] i would like to leave you with a verse from the old testament. it is from genesis chapter 50. it has sustained me and it has given me hope. you intended to harm me, but god intended it for good to accomplish what is now being done, the saving of many lives in many ways. god bless you all, and thank you. [applause] [chanting u.s.a.] >> nellie, we made it. thank you for your prayers up there. thank you all for being he
at the university of michigan. what it is is a response to, you know, a lot of new education options that are out there online and many of them are free, but, you go and take a course in history at one place, another one on writing and spanish at other places, what do you do with all the classes, especially since a lot of the other universities online they don't offer degrees. under this wisconsin university flexible option program, what students can do is earn a degree by passing a series of tests without ever stepping foot on the campus. now, you may need to take a few classes to get up to speed, but it offers students a ton of flexibility, it could really be a sign of where education is headed. you know, testing your way to a bachelor's degree. >> a lot of people go in their freshman year and say it makes sense. if i could take the test without going to the class. has the university determined how much this program will cost? >> reporter: not yet. but we're going to get more details when this thing goes online in the fall. >> okay. so i want to talk about something serious now. we should proba
counsel tree that will be america, whether it's education or training or whatever else. i just wanted to give just shout out to the brooklyn tabernacle choir. which i thought was just phenomenal. also lamar alexander, which was really exceptional and the -- not that the others weren't fine but they were. i thought the poet was great. >> that gives us an opportunity to speak more broadly about the ceremony it wasn't just the speech. the speech is at the heart of it, we can come back to that. we'll watch the president, vice president, go in to a room in the capital which they're going to sign the four nominations to the people he has mentioned that he is going to nominate for cabinet. let's see if we can listen in. >> he's going right to work now. >> lamar alexander, chuck schumer, vice president biden. house speaker boehner. eric cantor and nancy pelosi. >> ronald reagan established the tradition of going right to sign these kinds of documents for nominations. >> thank you very much, everybody. >> thank you. [ applause ] >> at a time when we know that washington is divided by on
thought here's where i differ. here's where i don't. i thought it was really educational and very provocative. >> ifill: did this president come across a chastened second-termer or an ambitious one in >> he came across different to me. missing from the president was what i had seen several times during the campaign and in the presidency in recent years there was sort of a pet lance. there was a pursed lips look. that was missing. this is a happy warrior. i thought a far more appealing figure in that sense. there seems since the 6th of november to be a sense of resolution about him. he seems more certain or sure-footed than he had been in the past. i can't imagine the president i heard today doing what he did on health care, turning it over to the congress for a year to work its will in the committees and back and forth. i mean this is somebody who is a lot more forceful executive i'd say >> ifill: maybe that's what informed... when he was quoting jefferson and saying that our truths are self-evident but not self-executing >> which is one of the best lines. he was constrained for t
to educate us. >> that was well-done. >> alex, you jump in here. parents will take risks with money knowing in the end even if they're not rich when they're old, they will have something so they spend all their money on tuition and raising kids. so i thought that was what he was talking about which is really important about our country. your thoughts, alex? >> i think one of the things that's been underdiscussed in terms of how progressive this message was is the foreign policy piece. advocating for engagement against the backdrop of a hostage situation in algeria is a very firm flag to plant in the ground. to say that as we see al qaeda cells multiplying, taking over a host of failed states in north africa and now west africa. to say these are not our enemies, that we can come in peace, that we can have peaceable relations with evil actors in the world is very much obama 1.0. for him to say that now i thought was really, really remarkable if you're talking about hawk versus dove, progressive versus conservative. >> i thought that was a direct message to the mullahs and to the people of ira
. . the kind of crisis we have in the economy is not really so much for highly skilled, highly educated people who are mobile and work and a global environment and a large market. it is for the non college-bound people who used to go into factory jobs, blue-collar jobs that have been disappearing because of global labor competition. this brings back something on both sides. >> i talked to young people lot. mentoring them was real important. our industry changed a lot. it used to be joe roughneck out there on the raid. -- rig. today it is so highly technical. we see so many people out there. use the computers up on our raised floor. -- use the computers up on our -- you see computers up on our rig floor. there are guys following what we are doing, making real time decisions. it is a different world today than it was before. an incredibly dirty business. -- nerdy business. it has become that. >> we had an odd editorial meeting about two years ago in which someone came in and was talking to us about the need for investments in wind power and also in mandating the use of gas. multiple choice quest
, started megachurches, educational institutions and eventually became deeply involved in politics. beverly lehay who is a particular interest of mine in this book founded a group called conservative women for america which still claims to be the largest women's political organization in the united states, and she based her organization on five spiritual principles; the bible, the family, patriotism, the sanctity of marriage, the sanctity of life. and she began to litigate arguing that religious parents should have more control, for example, over what their children were taught in school, arguing that, um, the era, the equal rights amendment for women, was a violation of the fundamental order of things and winning many of these cases. >> host: did you interview her for your book? >> guest: i did not. she actually lives in seclusion now. she's very -- she retired about almost 15 years ago now and lives, um, in california again. >> host: somebody you would have liked to have talked to? >> guest: i would very much like to talk to her. and one of the things that i think is really important is t
's a hard story to cover. the president has to be an educate on climate issue. by giving it the form, not a paragraph, he's gone a long way to start the second term discussion on climate we need. >> we can't judge how historians are going to see this. i suspect on many issues, they'll see it as forward thinking. that doesn't take away from the fact it probably will be seen as the next couple years as a partisan speech. i think they best test how partisan the speech is, is not what republicans say on it, what democrats running for re-election on the senate two years from now say on the speech and what democrats say in swing districts about the speech. i don't know you're going to get a lot of these democrats running in conservative states where the president got below 45%, and there are quite a few, in 2014, are going to be talking about gay rights, climate change and gun control. rober robert. >> look. every district is unique and different, as you well know and as we know, as we looking through the map. i think the speech, talking, as doug said about seneca falls and stonewall and s
. >>> big news in the world of education. federal officials say the high school graduation rate is going up. the nationwide average climbed to just above 78% in 2010, the last year with numbers available. there's a lot of work yet to be done. but it's the highest it's been since 1974. the main reason, they say, fewer jobs out there to tempt young people to leave high school. >>> still ahead as we continue on a tuesday evening, a major breakthrough regarding a big worry for a lot of parents, a lot of athletes, detecting the damage done by concussions and what could happen then later in life. >>> then later on, why beyonce's fans along with millions of inauguration viewers are saying, say it ain't so. >>> as we mentioned, there's news tonight on the subject of concussions which are finally getting a lot more attention of late among athletes and among parents. up till now, there's been no good way to figure out how much damage has been done after a concussion exactly. but ucla researchers working with some former nfl players may have figured out the answer. our report from our chief medical ed
of you. and our goal is to educate people so that this great depression can never happen again. but it's very much in the wake oof the time an idea that we can teach people certain skills and if they learn the skills we will all be okay spent the dark set of the personal-finance industry with helaine olen saturday night at 10 on after words on c-span2. look for more booktv online, like this on facebook. >> i think it's all an evolutionary process. you go into this role and my sense is that you never get comfortable if you're always pushing for change and growth, not just in yourself but in the issues you care about. you are never done. so there's never a point in time where you feel like, they are, i am now here and i can do this the same way all the time. it's always changing. they changed is given the status issues of the country, and you never know what those are going to be from one day to the next. so you have to be flexible and fluid, and open to revolve. >> the first ladies, their private and public lives. c-span is teaming up with the white house historical association for a fi
secretary of education arne duncan mention that he and his family saying they would be here today. this has grown up within just the past six weeks after the newtown shooting. these are not people who have a lot of experience organizing marches. they neil is something organ -- they feel this is something organic, very grassroots. they want to see where it will take them. >> thank you for your reporting ther there. >>> for much of the country, this morning it is cold out there. the national weather service warning of bitterly cold temperatures, possibly deadly conditions this weekend for much of the northeast, mid-atlantic, and the midwest. the tennessee valley and the carolinas are also on ice. any reprieve is still days away. frigid air also making life tougher for victims of superstorm sandy. many still don't have even the basic utilities to heat their home since the storm struck. susan candiotti is joining us from staten island. you spoke with a resident there who still can't go home. is that a problem for many? i mean, what is life like for these people now? >> reporter: it is a problem
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